Tag Archives: Song Dynasty

Hangzhou Trip Part 4: The Smiling Buddha in the “Paris of the East”

25 Mar

Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple, originally founded in 328 AD, is the most famous Buddhist Temple in Hangzhou. It makes an easy day-trip from where I was staying on the south bank of West Lake.

On the way from the bus stop to the temple, you have to go past some truly epic carvings–IMHO, even better than the temple. Buddhist monks carved scenes into limestone cliffs over a period of hundreds and hundreds of years. The whole area is called Feilai Feng, or “The Peak that Flew from Afar.” It gives me the mental image of a winged mountain, flying a great distance to land next to Lingyin Temple.

From which “afar” did it fly? Stories vary–some say it flew all the way from India, the origin of Buddhism. The Laughing Buddha, pictured below, I think dates from the Song Dynasty–the golden age of Hangzhou.

Supposedly, if you rub his belly your wishes will come true. But I think you have to climb the cliff first…

The Laughing Buddha

Hangzhou is sometimes called the “Paris of the East.” I think the two towns have more similarities than you’d think–both are a consistently aesthetically pleasing experience (assuming you spend lots of time walking past the Seine, anyway), and both can be SUPER touristy (just try the north bank of West Lake). But both draw tourists for a reason. Sure, the Eiffel Tower is all rusty up close, and the lines to go up are awful. But you can get lost in Pere Lachaise cemetery for hours, wandering between the graves of 19th century artists, and stuff like that makes Paris epic.

West Lake, with its utterly inauthentic, Disney-ified good looks, makes Hangzhou pretty. But stuff like epic, centuries-old carvings of Buddha (and the twelve apostles?! or something) on the side of a cliff is what makes Hangzhou really cool. The rolling tea-covered hills just outside the city don’t hurt, either. I can’t wait to go back in spring sometime, when the villagers fry tea on the street and everything is blooming.

Verdict: Hangzhou is definitely worth a visit, even if you find Dragonwell tea yoǔ diaň cù (a little bitter).

Next time: Shenzhen (I swear I had good reason to spend a week there, because miracles do happen!)

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