Tag Archives: Victoria Harbour

Hong Kong Trip 3: My Continued Struggle to Accept Potable Water and Victoria Peak, which is a Metaphor for Victory

11 Apr

This view from the the Circle Trail at the top of Victoria Peak is a metaphor for potable water, which is a metaphor for development, which is a metaphor for what I was deprived of in Changsha, which is a metaphor for love. I’m not saying the developing world is devoid of love. I’m saying that Changsha was.

I’m also saying that metaphors don’t obey the transitive property.

About two hours later, on the other side of Victoria Peak, this was the view:

The Victoria Harbour, seen above, has been shrinking due to land reclamation projects for two thousand years, starting during the Western Han Dynasty when beaches were reclaimed into fields for salt production. Major land reclamation projects have been conducted since the 19th century, when the British first colonized the area.

The entire urban area of Tsim Sha Tsui (one of the many names I carefully avoided saying during my grueling 2.5-day stay in Hong Kong), for example, was reclaimed from the Bay. It’s the part of Kowloon that I was staying in, and where many of the territory’s museums are now located.

As I was staring out at this extremely historically-charged view and considering the epic wonder of human continuity, inevitable geological change, and glittery lights, an attractive Indian-Canadian man came and struck up a conversation with me. He casually offered to take a photo of me in front of the view, which turned out terrible. He took one without flash, which turned out worse.

Then, said easy-on-the-eyes gentleman invited me to take a turn about the Circle Trail with him in the deepening twilight. Ever quick on the uptake, I unhesitatingly said, “No, I’ve been going clockwise on the path, I don’t want to go backwards.”

I guess the moral is that when they called me “task-oriented instead of people-oriented,” they meant “borderline autistic,” and I will probably die alone. But at least my children (born out of wedlock) won’t have a weird Alberta accent.

Next: Katherine stops bumming us all out with romantic incompetence and takes us all on a trip to see A MASSIVE STATUE OF BUDDHA ON A MOUNTAIN. Will there be vegetarian dim sum? Will there be pictures of large quantities of dried fish?! Only time can tell!

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Hong Kong, Land of Potable Water and Colonial-era Firetraps: Part I

6 Apr

My hostel was this sketchy little quarter-of-a-floor in a weird massive building with multiple elevators to non-adjoining wings. It was pure luck that I actually found the darn thing in under 20 minutes, as opposed to 3 hours. Luck plus good signage on the ground floor, I guess…there were like a hundred hostels in the building, which was this colonial-era firetrap called the Chungking Mansions (actually only one mansion?? more like the Chungking Sketchy Apartment Building, if you ask me). The ground floor was absolutely filled with Indian dudes conducting business (specifically men, not women for some reason). At the front were money-changers, and there were little convenience stands and restaurants sprinkled throughout–but when I wandered towards the back of the floor I got lots of stares as a white lady alone. I also got delicious gulab jamun for breakfast because no one could stop me, and a random semi-date with a nice Finnish boy because I was young, free and in Hong Kong for a weekend.

The Chungking Mansions: Source of hostel beds, gulab jamun and Finns

My hostel was located on Kowloon Peninsula, not Hong Kong island proper. The difference between the two areas, in feel, is this: the “Central” district of Hong Kong island is the business district, where all the foreigners have traditionally hung out. It feels pretty much like the financial district of New York City–tall buildings, impersonal, lots of gray and neon.

Kowloon, on the other hand, feels like the area right next to the financial district of New York City, where you might actually be able to buy food for under $50 while still feeling fairly ritzy, still surrounded by tall buildings, gray and neon. It seems foreigners have traditionally shunned this area as “too Chinese to deign to visit,” because the Sort of Foreigners Who Go to Hong Kong Regularly For Business are apparently kind of d-bags. (citation: my friend Dora who is from Hong Kong, also Lonely Planet I think).

Separating the two areas is Victoria Harbour.

I was excited about Hong Kong’s potable water, but less so the firetraps. I heard that the best way to find cheap housing in Hong Kong was to live in the harbour. So I purchased the below boat.

Next time: Did Katherine really spend the rest of her year abroad living on a traditional Chinese junk in Victoria Harbour? What about spring semester? What about AMERICA?! The mystery continues